Skip to main content

Rhetoric


Published April 16, 2010


LibriVox recording of Rhetoric, by Aristotle, translated by Thomas Taylor. Read by Geoffrey Edwards.

The Rhetoric was developed by Aristotle during two periods when he was in Athens, the first between 367 to 347 BCE (when he was seconded to Plato in the Academy), and the second between 335 to 322 BCE (when he was running his own school, the Lyceum). The Rhetoric consists of three books. Book I offers a general overview, presenting the purposes of rhetoric and a working definition; it also offers a detailed discussion of the major contexts and types of rhetoric. Book II discusses in detail the three means of persuasion that an orator must rely on: those grounded in credibility (ethos), in the emotions and psychology of the audience (pathos), and in patterns of reasoning (logos). Book III introduces the elements of style (word choice, metaphor, and sentence structure) and arrangement (organization). Some attention is paid to delivery, but generally the reader is referred to the Poetics for more information in that area. (Summary from Wikipedia)

For further information, including links to online text, reader information, RSS feeds, CD cover or other formats (if available), please go to the LibriVox catalog page for this recording.

For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox.org.

M4B audiobook containing Text


Date 2010-04-16
Source Librivox recording of a public-domain text


Reviews

Reviewer: librivoxbooks - - January 21, 2014
Subject: Correction
The first reviewer wrote: "Librivox coaches readers in style."

This is completely incorrect, and I have no idea where the reviewer got this idea. Reading style is one of the things that is never commented on at LibriVox. It is always the reader's choice.
Reviewer: cseab - - January 21, 2014
Subject: "Very good for what you pay for.."
Before people write negative reviews, they should look around and check in reality the real cost of an audiobook like this. Well gentleman, this is for free!

I think here we are getting much more than what we're paying for.. If you don't agree, it's simple, open your pocket and buy a $40 commercial audiobook, problem solved!;)

Best regards!
Reviewer: pdfan - - February 6, 2012
Subject: Great job!
I strongly disagree with the reviewer that says the reader has no understanding of the meaning of what he is reading. On the contrary, I think he does a great job of making it understandable to anyone who is listening. His pacing is perfect for digesting Aristotles rich use of language.
Reviewer: Sorker - - April 18, 2010
Subject: Mailed it in
Unlistenable. The reader gives no impression that he understands, or cares to, the meaning of the words he is speaking. He lapses into a sing-song, juvenile style suitable for children's books but not here. Librivox coaches readers in style. Let's hope for a better rendition to replace this one.
PEOPLE ALSO FOUND
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Thomas Hardy
787
0
0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by William Cullen Bryant
1,155
0
0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Clemence Dane
1,542
0
0
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by George Borrow
392
0
0
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Nathaniel Hawthorne
170
0
0
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by William Cowper
1,004
0
0
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Daniel G. Brinton
2,072
0
0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by King James Version (KJV)
369
0
0
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Charles Dickens
681
0
0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text